Omelettes

with spring onion, goat cheese and thyme

Sometimes I want something quick, simple and satisfying for dinner and there is nothing better for that than the egg. I do have to admit that I’m a bit obsessed with eggs. It’s the perfect little package filled with promise and possibility, protein and fat, ready to be transformed however you see fit. It can be breakfast, dessert, appetizer or one of my favorite, fast go-to dinners; the omelette.

  I like to make them the “classic” French way. No browning. Still slightly runny inside. It’s the perfect blank canvas to fill with whatever you like and we typically fill it with whatever we have in the fridge. In this case it was some spring onions, goat cheese and thyme. Like most things, I recommend you keep it simple with just a few select fillings, if any at all, and keep the flavors focused, the egg is the star here, the other stuff is just there for enhancement. Don’t challenge the ego of the egg.

spring onion eggs
It's the perfect little package filled with promise and possibility, protein and fat, ready to be transformed however you see fit.
sautéed onions sautéed onions
Omelettes with Spring Onion, Goat Cheese and Thyme Omelettes with Spring Onion, Goat Cheese and Thyme
Omelettes with Spring Onion, Goat Cheese and Thyme
Omelettes with Spring Onion, Goat Cheese and Thyme

An omelette is simple, at least in theory. Make sure your eggs are at room temp. Beat them so the yolk and white is one homogenous yellow liquid, no blobs and add a dash of water, maybe a teaspoon, at most. This is also one rare occasion where I don’t add salt beforehand. I’ll save that till the end, along with some additional butter melted over the top to add that delicious glisten. The other secret about making the perfect omelet is that it really doesn’t matter if it’s perfect or not. It gets better and more familiar each time you make it. So crack some eggs, don’t be afraid and get ready to eat up!

Omelettes

with spring onion, goat cheese and thyme

  • Eggs (2-3 per omelette)
  • Spring Onion
  • Goat Cheese – However much you want
  • Thyme
  • Butter or Olive Oil
  • S&P
For the Filling – Do this first before you even crack an egg.

Gently sauté the onion in some butter till soft and slightly sweet but not quite browned or caramelized. Then finish it off with some fresh thyme and check for seasoning.

For the The Omelette

Get a pan on medium heat, preferably non-stick, and add in a good bit of butter or olive oil, really whatever fat you like. Make sure you use room temp eggs and beat them with a dash of water. You want a completely homogenous mixture here. And, try not to beat in a ton of air either, unless you’re into that sort of thing. I’m not. Next, drop your eggs in the pan and alternatively shake that pan over the flame and pull in the edges that are just set to the middle of the pan, allowing the runny bits to ooze out and set on the outer edges of the pan. Then shake some more. You’re aiming for a small small curd and creamy texture, so try and keep the pan moving. Once it looks about half set you should probably turn the heat off. The beauty of the omelet is in the gently cooked and just barely set, slightly runny interior. So, aim for undercooking the egg rather than over cooking it to where it gets brown and rubbery. Even if you think it looks too undercooked, just trust in the egg and that by the time you fill it and plate it, there is enough residual heat to cook the remaining bit to the perfect consistency. Now you’re ready to fill it. Add whatever you like, if anything at all, and then plate it up. I like to plate mine with a nice roll to it, but it really doesn’t need to be perfectly plated. It can rip and have holes, it’ll still taste good.  But if you’re going for the roll, take a small spatula and while tilting the pan towards your plate and gliding it, gently, coax the top edge so it falls over on itself. And then do that a few more times till it looks like how an omelet generally looks. Put it on your plate and eat up!

Yum

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